FAQ

Music Therapy

Music Therapy is the clinical & evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program. (www.musictherapy.org)

A board-certified music therapist will conduct an assessment to observe a person’s areas of need as well as his or her strengths and weaknesses. The therapist will then create a sort of “music prescription” specific to the individual’s needs and goal areas that are to be addressed. This prescription will identify non-musical goals and objectives as well as the specific musical approaches that will be utilized to address the individual’s areas of need. The individualized interventions created will be implemented in a way that ensures a gratifying and successful experience while still challenging the individual to reach their greatest potential.
This largely depends of individual preference as well as the goals that are trying to be achieved. Music can be used in an active and/or passive way. Music can be used in an active way by playing instruments, writing songs, or singing. Music can be used in a passive way by listening to music, watching a concert, or receiving vibro-tactile input from an instrument while someone else is playing.
Music therapy can benefit people of all ages and levels of functioning. Some examples of clientele include but are not limited to:
  • Children and adults with developmental disabilities such as Autism, Down’s Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, Rhett Syndrome, etc.
  • Children and adults with physical disabilities such as Cerebral Palsy and Spina Bifada
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • The aging elderly with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s Disease
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Mental Health Needs

Art Therapy

No, you do not, but you do need an open mind and readiness to explore with your own creativity.
Art therapists are licensed mental health professionals who have gone through significant training and education and have achieved a Master of Science in Art Therapy degree. In the United States, they achieve licensure through the American Art Therapy Association. Many go on to earn board certification and other complementary licensures in the fields of counseling, psychology, or education.
The sky’s the limit! Our sessions are developed around the client’s needs and interests. We offer a vast range of materials including paint, markers, fibers, clay, paper, and even recycled materials. Each process will be facilitated by the therapist to allow for a beneficial and safe experience.
Not at all. Art therapy is about allowing the artist to explore their own creative process. After all, you are the expert in your art-making. The art therapist is there to help guide those personal explorations, rather than interpret.
Some responses we look for in an appropriate candidate for art therapy are:
  • Client stays on task/maintains attention longer when attending to an art task rather than a non-art task
  • There aren’t many other approaches that are effective
  • Art-making or art-related tasks appear to be motivating to the client and the client is able to complete tasks and follow directions while engaged with art.
  • Client interacts positively with art tools and materials, and is willing to engage with them.
  • If experiencing physical pain, the client demonstrates relief from pain through distraction with art, music or sensory techniques (Noted by change in facial expression, deeper breathing, or verbally expressing relief)
  • Client demonstrates focus/attention on art-making or art materials.
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